Happy 200th Birthday, Dr. Livingstone!

March 19, 2013  By: Gretchen

“Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” His meeting with H. M. Stanley nearly 150 years ago on the shores of Lake Tanganyika gave rise to the now-famous quotation. Today we celebrate the Scottish medical missionary and African transcontinental explorer David Livingstone on the 200th anniversary of his birth! In honor of that anniversary, we are offering a special selection of four trips that follow in the explorer’s legendary footsteps.

IN LIVINGSTONE’S FOOTSTEPS: THE EARLY YEARS

Livingstone first set foot in Cape Town in March 1841, later venturing into northern South Africa and Botswana, and was often the first European to meet local tribes. “Livingstone’s The Early Years” explores the rich history and excitement of South Africa’s mother city, Cape Town, plus Botswana’s greater Kalahari region including the Magadakadi Pans and the wildlife-rich Okavango Delta.

IN LIVINGSTONE’S FOOTSTEPS: VICTORIA FALLS AND BEYOND

Livingstone was the first European to see the Mosi-oa-Tunya (“the smoke that thunders”) waterfall, which he renamed Victoria Falls after Queen Victoria.  Our “Victoria Falls and Beyond” safari includes a “flight of angels” helicopter tour over the falls, an exploration of the falls by foot, a tour of the colonial city of Livingstone, Zambia, as well as many activities on the Zambezi River and the surrounding wildlife parks.

IN LIVINGSTONE’S FOOTSTEPS: SOURCE OF THE NILE

In 1866 Livingstone traveled to Zanzibar from where he set out to seek the source of the Nile. After an extended period of no contact, Henry Morton Stanley was sent to find him by the New York Herald in 1869. Stanley discovered him on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in 1871 with the now famous words “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” The “Source of the Nile” safari will visit some of the special places the explorer visited on this journey including Zanzibar and lake Tanganyika, where there is an opportunity to see resident chimpanzees.

IN LIVINGSTONE’S FOOTSTEPS: THE FINAL JOURNEY

David Livingstone died in Chief Chitambo’s village in what is now Zambia in 1873. Because the villagers believed his heart belonged in Africa, Livingstone’s heart was buried under a Mvula tree, now the site of the Livingstone Memorial. His body was carried more than 1,000 miles by his loyal attendants Susi and Chuma to the coast, where it was returned to Britain for burial. “The Final Journey” safari visits important historical places in Tanzania, including Mikumi National Park, a stopping point for Chuma and Susi, and home to large mammals, predators (including large numbers of tree-climbing lions) and over 400 species of birds.

If you’d like to follow In Livingstone’s Footsteps, call us to plan your journey!